Performance Prospect Supreme!

Next Ad »
Name
Breed
Arabian
Gender
Stallion
Color
Bay
Temperament
3 (1 - calm; 10 - spirited)
Registry
NA
Reg Number
NA
Height
15.0 hh
Foal Date
Country
United States
Views/Searches
60/2,507
Ad Status
Available
Price
$10,000

Arabian Stallion for Sale in Burlington, WI

Extremely nice 1999 Bay Arabian Gelding. Definite Performance Potential . . . Excellent Reining, Working Cow Horse, Western Pleasure or Endurance Prospect! This Guy will be Somebody's Winner! Wonderful People Orientated, Willing Disposition. And did I say Pretty . . . Has Qualified for Regionals 6 Different Times in 4 Different Regions, including 10, 11, 13 and 14 . . . Halter Division! Currently Qualified for Regions 10 and 13 . . . And NEVER Shown at Regionals! Sire is a US National Top Ten Reiner currently also embarking on an Additional Career in Working Cow Horse. This Bay Gelding is a TRUE Example of a Halter AND Performance Horse! This Guy has had Extensive Handling . . . All the Ground Work is Done, Ready To Start Under Saddle. Previous Roundpen Work will make for an Easy T
... more»ransition! Clips, Trailers, Bathes, Stands for Vet and Farrier and is a No Stress Traveler!

About Burlington, WI

Prior to the arrival of Europeans in the area, Native American mounds were constructed near the present location of Burlington. For example, around 1830, a small Potawatomi village stood in what is now the Town of Burlington, though it wasn't larger than the present-day city. The earliest certain European presence in what is now Burlington was in the fall of 1799, when a group of French explorers and missionaries led by Francis Morgan de Vereceones made a portage from the Root River to the Fox River, reaching the Fox at approximately Burlington's present location. The first European settlers in Burlington were Moses Smith (the son of a Revolutionary War veteran) and William Whiting. Smith and Whiting had been in the area previously, making a so-called "jackknife claim" to the land (carving their names and the date on trees in the vicinity) on December 15, 1835.

Contact BAD FARM
Send a Message: