Gorgeous Darkbay Mare 16h Shows/Trails

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Name
Breed
Thoroughbred
Gender
Mare
Color
Bay
Temperament
3 (1 - calm; 10 - spirited)
Registry
NA
Reg Number
NA
Height
16.0 hh
Foal Date
Country
United States
Views/Searches
332/12,150
Ad Status
Unavailable
Price
$350

Thoroughbred Mare for Sale in Kingsville, MD

This is a lease only. This young mare is a gorgeous girl who loves to please. She has great ground manners and learns quickly. But she can be spooky and therefore needs a calm and patient rider, who is ready to work for a great show mount. I am looking to move her to a farm in the Kingsville - Perry Hall area called Hawk's Hollow. It has a jumping ring and a round - pen, and a covered ring is being constructed. We also have a trailer and can arrange to transport to shows in which she is entered. We will provide her tack as necessary and available. Lessons are available at Hawk's Hollow. The price for the lease is negotiable, but I am looking at about $350- - - - - - - - - I will consider a joint lease with my Tennessee Walker named Diamond Dust Sparkles. I can send pictures.

About Kingsville, MD

Kingsville takes its name from Abraham King (1760–1836), who died there on December 15 at the age of 76. King, a native of Willistown Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania, acquired some 290 acres (1.2 km 2) of land from Thomas Kell (a county judge) in and about the site of Kingsville from parts of the original grants of Leaf's Chance, William the Conqueror, Selby's Hope, John's Delight and Onion's Prospect Hill, according to a deed executed May 13, 1816. King lived in the old Hugh Deane-John Paul mansion (later known as the Kingsville Inn and presently as the Lassahn Funeral home on Belair Road) with his wife Elizabeth Taylor, a sister of the Hon. John Taylor of Willistown, who settled in the West and was the Chief Judge of the Superior Court of Mississippi for a number of years. An 1823 assessment of Old District 2 showed "Abraham King with 290 acres of 'William the Conqueror' and $350 worth of improvements, no slaves." The King family operated a tavern according to an 1847 advertisement in American Farmer (a pioneer agricultural journal) at the forks of Bel Air and Joppa (presumably present day Jerusalem) roads.

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